Woodland voles are burrowing animals that push up mounds of earth at the entrances to their underground tunnels. They scavenge for food, like gasses, seeds, fallen fruit, tree bark, and roots, throughout the day and night and are attracted to residential properties with gardens. Woodland voles breed all year long and have short gestation periods. Though adults only live for a few short months, their presence on private lawns is destructive and should be eliminated as quickly as possible.

Identifying Features

One of the smallest species of voles in North America, woodland voles grow between 4 and 5 inches long and weigh little more than an ounce. They are chunky rodents with chestnut-brown fur. Well adapted for a life of underground burrowing, the pest has small eyes and ears, powerful clawed feet, and sensitive whiskers.


These adaptable rodents are found throughout the Eastern United States. Some of woodland voles' preferred habitats include orchards, fallow fields, farms, and hardwood forests with dense leaf litter. They cause significant damage where they live as the pests chew the bark and roots of crops and trees.