SUGGESTED PROTOCOL FOR LAND CLEARING
 

targeting specific species. Minimum effort: approximately 3 person hours per day commencing in the early evening.
d) Sherman traps – This method targets small arboreal and terrestrial mammals. These traps should be cleared daily and reset. Trap placement will be influenced by vegetation diversity, the size and shape of the habitat area and by naturally occurring features such as logs, rock outcrops, tree bases and clumping vegetation. As a guide, all distinctly different broad vegetation communities should be surveyed. Minimum effort: 100 traps over four nights, arranged in 5-10 transects with 10 or 20 traps in each transect with trap placement at 5yds. apart. A variety of baits should be utilized such as rolled oats with peanut +/- honey, bacon, canned fish. When conducting arboreal trapping with this method, a bait mixture may be applied on the trunk and braches near the trap to act as an attractant to species such as flying and other squirrels.
e) Cage traps - This method targets medium to large arboreal and terrestrial mammals. These traps should be cleared daily and reset. Trap placement will be influenced by vegetation diversity, the size and shape of the habitat area and by naturally occurring features such as logs, rock outcrops, tree bases and clumping vegetation. As a guide, all distinctly different broad vegetation communities should be surveyed. Minimum effort: 20 traps over four nights, arranged in 5 transects with trap placement at 5-20m apart. A variety of baits should be utilized such as rolled oats with peanut +/- honey, bacon, canned fish.
f) Bird surveys – Fixed or random transects are walked with five (5) minutes spent stationary at designated locations along the transects. Birds are recorded indicating the method of identification (i.e. call or visual observation) and the type and location of habitat. Minimum effort: 30-60 minutes commencing prior to and during dawn to early morning and prior to dusk.
g) Harp traps, mist nets and sonic bat detectors - These methods target insectivorous bats. Trap and sonic detector (i.e. ANABAT) should be located within suitable habitat where insectivorous bats are likely to frequent (i.e. natural flyways between vegetation and narrow forest tracks). Calls recorded from a sonic detector (i.e. ANABAT) should be analyzed by a suitable qualified person to ensure accurate species identification.

Wildlife safety risk mitigation measures.

3.21 In some circumstances, the removal of wildlife from development sites may not be necessary due to retention of habitat, and/or minimal impacts of the development or activity on wildlife or habitats. However, operational works may still present hazards to wildlife retained on site or inhabiting areas adjacent to the site.

For example: Operational works may require the use of heavy earthmoving equipment on a site adjacent to wetland habitat bounded by a major road. Risk mitigation may require temporary fencing of the road to minimize risk of motor vehicle accidents. Operational works may also require the construction of deep ditches or footings, presenting risks to wildlife wandering onto the site. Risk