SUGGESTED PROTOCOL FOR LAND CLEARING
 

Termination of a contract by a wildlife control operator

2.19 A wildlife control operator may terminate a contract with a developer for any reason by giving due notice in writing, stating the reasons for termination of the contract to the developer or developer’s nominated agent and the relevant local, state or Federal government authority.

2.20 Notwithstanding section 2.21 below a wildlife control operator may be liable for damages for breach of contract.

Misconduct by a wildlife control operator

2.21 A wildlife control operator may be guilty of misconduct if:

a) there has been an abuse of the powers given under local, State and/or Federal laws; that is, either Animal Welfare Directions or Stop Work Orders have been issued inappropriately;
b) he or she has failed to apply due diligence in the detection of wildlife at a site, resulting in injury or death to a wild animal, or the likelihood of injury or death to a wild animal;
c) he or she has failed to apply, or define in the Wildlife Protection and Management Plan, fair, reasonable and appropriate measures, resulting in injury or death to a wild animal, or the likelihood of injury or death to a wild animal; or
d) he or she has failed to make provision for the proper care and/or veterinary needs of a captured animal.

STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES FOR WILDLIFE CONTROL OPERATORS

SECTION 3: SITE ASSESSMENT

General principles

3.1 The wildlife control operator has a significant burden of responsibility to ensure that the animal welfare and ecological impacts resulting from a development or activity, for which they are engaged in that role, are minimized.

3.2 The general principles of due diligence in the detection of wildlife, and fair, reasonable and appropriate measures in preventing wildlife loss or ecological damage, apply to the practice of wildlife control operation as they do for any individual engaged in a relevant activity.

3.3 Wildlife control operators are expected to have specialized knowledge in the detection, identification and removal of wildlife; assessment of potential impacts of developments or activities on wildlife; an understanding of basic ecological principles; good animal handling and care skills; local knowledge of appropriate release sites for wildlife, if applicable; and a